Welcome to Dream, Draw Create!
This blog features art projects for children. These projects have been used in my classes. My lessons allow children to learn about all the elements and principles of art while striving to introduce them to many genres of art.

"It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge." - Albert Einstein

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Indian corn grades 1,2 and 3

The students painted these colorful pieces in preparation for Thanksgiving, and in conjunction with their social studies unit.  
We talked about shape, organic verses geometric.  We looked at the patterns on the corn.  We admired the wonderful toned down color palette.
We began by drawing the elongated oval shape of the corn.  We added vertical lines with black crayon then horizontal lines.  We painted in the newly created pattern with tones of red, orange, yellow, green and brown.
The husks were the last detail to be painted. 
At the end of the lesson I introduced them to the story of the "Three Sisters" corn, green beans and squash. 
 All the students were successful with this lesson which covered one forty minute art class.

Saturday, October 17, 2015


This was a drawing and painting lesson done with a group of first grade students through third grade students.  We looked at landscape paintings such as those done by Grand Woods. We talked about the Fall harvest and how Scarecrows protect the crops from birds and other little animals.  We set about to draw by making the letter "T" in the center of our paper.  Shapes such as rectangles and squares were used to build the shirt and pants around the "T" structure.  Some children chose to draw hills in the background while some enjoyed adding pumpkins, bumble bees, corn husks and such.  Tempera cakes were used to complete the lesson.

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Landscape paintings inspired by Grant Woods

This was a fun lesson that I did with a group of nearly four and five year old students.  I shared some photographs of landscape paintings by the American artist Grant Woods.
We talked about creating a gently curved line to represent a rolling hill like the ones we saw in the paintings.  I instructed the students to begin at one side of the paper and draw an imaginary line across the paper to the other side of the paper.  Once the students were comfortable with their imaginary line they could pick up their black crayon and draw a real line.  Next we put our finger on the newly created line somewhere close to the center but not at the far edge of the line.  We then repeated drawing another curved line to represent our next hill.  This step was once again repeated.  The students drew the sun either rising, setting or shining bright in the sky.
Tempra cakes were used to paint.  We tend to always start with yellow as it gets dirty so quickly.  From there the students mixed shades of green directly on their papers.
The results were awesome and the students felt satisfied and happy.

Sunday, September 20, 2015

The Dot by Peter Reynolds and how it inspired us

the dot by Peter H. Reynolds is such a relevant story to read to students during their first art class.  For my students it set the tone for the year instilling a positive message to always give it a try, do your best and don't be afraid to be yourself.  After all each student should come to art class feeling uninhibited and eager to enjoy the process of making art.
In addition to reading the dot we looked at other books as well such as The Sky by Ariane Dewey we observed the linear pattern the birds created in the sky.  I will back track by saying that I had introduced a dot as a line going somewhere.  Throughout this story we observed the many types of line created in nature.  

We also looked at the story HAROLD and the PURPLE CRAYON by Crockett Johnson.  This story reinforces the concept of a dot as a line going somewhere.  We all agreed that Harold had quite an imagination and traveled far and wide creating lines with his purple crayon.

Paint and paper were set out for the students to use to create their own paintings beginning with a dot.  
The results were quite varied just as I had hoped they would be.
We're on our way to a happy and creative new school year in the art room!  Thank you Peter H. Reynolds for the inspiration.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Wild Things

Students in grades 1 through 3 created these delightful "Wild Things" based on the story by Maurice Sendak.  We looked at the book and talked about how the wild things were happy and not mean.  We noticed they all had smiles.  We looked at the wild things and noticed they were part animal and sometimes part human. We enjoyed seeing the textures and shapes which inspired us to pick up our pencils and crayons and begin creating.  We added styrofoam balls for the eyeballs attached with brass paper fasteners as an added special touch.  I think you'll agree these are some pretty "Wild Things!"

Thursday, February 12, 2015

Thiebauld inspired cakes - Grades 4 and 6

Some samples by my grade 4 through 6 classes.  Students drew their cakes on 12" x 18" white drawing paper.  Many students as you can see chose a theme for their cake whether it be sports, holidays or nature.  Oil pastel was used and emphasis was given to highlighting and shading.  The final step was to use colored paper to create a symmetrical pedestal to sit their cake on.