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Welcome to Dream, Draw Create! This blog features art projects for children. These projects have been used in my classes. My lessons allow children to learn about all the elements and principles of art while striving to introduce them to many genres of art.

"It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge." - Albert Einstein

Thursday, February 12, 2015

Thiebauld inspired cakes - Grades 4 and 6

Some samples by my grade 4 through 6 classes.  Students drew their cakes on 12" x 18" white drawing paper.  Many students as you can see chose a theme for their cake whether it be sports, holidays or nature.  Oil pastel was used and emphasis was given to highlighting and shading.  The final step was to use colored paper to create a symmetrical pedestal to sit their cake on.








Thursday, January 29, 2015

Mondrian animals

Grade 4 used black paint to create Mondrian type vertical and horizontal lines.  Red, yellow and blue primary color paint was added in the spaces created by the the lines.  Students also chose to paint some spaces black or leave some white.  Week two the students drew an animal shape of their choice on practice paper.  The outline of their animal was then cut out and traced onto the painted paper.  During week two the traced shape on the painted paper was cut out and glued onto a white background paper.  Crayons were used to add details such as trees, sky, plants etc.  Some of the students also chose to use the painted paper for added details in the background, such as stars in the sky. This lesson took three forty minute classes to complete.






Friday, January 16, 2015

Shadows on a cold winters night

This is a lesson I never tire of. Through the years it has never disappointed.  The results are always stunning and the children learn a lot through the process.  Snowmen and winter trees add beauty to an otherwise cold and trying time of year.  This winter has been particularly cold making it almost impossible for man or beast to be outside.
The students began with a 12" x 18" sheet of dark blue construction paper.  Dark gray is also another nice background choice.  Next using white chalk the students drew their horizon line after which a full moon was drawn in the sky.  The tree was drawn with chalk first so that  any mistakes could be erased.  Once the students were happy with their design a black crayon was used to go over the chalk drawing.  We spent some time discussing line and how to taper the branches. The students also overlapped branches and  reached up and off the paper to create depth.  Snowmen were added at this point and some accent designs as well to complete the composition.
The following week a lesson was given on how to create shadows on the ground using black crayon.  The foreground was colored in with white chalk, being careful to work around the shadows.  Tissues were used to blend the chalk to create a soft effect.  White creamy paint was taken out next so that the branches of the trees could be frosted in snow.  The white paint could also be used to paint snowflakes or stars in the sky.
This lesson took my fourth and fifth grade students two forty minute classes to complete.






Sunday, November 9, 2014

Britto inspired Fall art work


I didn't want Fall to end without posting these beautiful pieces of art work by my fourth, fifth and sixth grade students.  They were each so unique and original in their interpretation of Romero Britto's work.  There are many YouTube videos to choose from when presenting the work of this Brazilian born Pop artist.  It was a good starting point for the students to see and hear Britto speak about his work.
From there the students chose a Halloween or Fall themed subject for their piece.  Their ideas were sketched on white drawing paper with chalk.  Pumpkins, witches hats and cats were the most popular themes for this lesson.  They became the focal point of the piece.  The students then broke up the space by creating lines going in various directions such as vertical, horizontal and diagonal.  Attention was paid to size and scale of the the new shapes created by the lines.  Once this step was complete it was time to paint the new spaces created.  A palette of toned down paints were used to give an overall feeling of Fall.  The following week pattern was discussed and the students added a variety of dots, spirals or wavy lines to their design. The final step was to use black paint to go over their original chalk drawing.







Friday, October 24, 2014

Reflecting on the Hudson River Painters - Grades 1, 2 & 3

Living in the region so closely associated with the Hudson River Painters is a real bonus at this time of the year.  The children are well aware of the beauty surrounding them and inspiration comes easily to them.
This lesson was a quick forty minute lesson which involved many different mediums such as crayon, regular and chunky, pastel, and paint.  Many concepts, and methods of application of the various mediums were introduced and reviewed.  For instance we discussed the smooth  texture we achieve when a crayon is rubbed on its side on paper.  We also spoke about value and how we could get a light or dark shade by the pressure that was applied on the crayon.
 Before the trees were drawn the paper was folded in half and then black pastel was used for drawing the trees on the folded line. The bold pastel lines, the use of thick and think lines for branches helped to create a nice focal point for these pieces. Movement was also discussed and how it would look like a windy day if the branches of the trees were bent or curved.
  Students could either portray the leaves reflecting in a body of water or simply have them appear to be falling on the ground.
Other elements were added with crayon such as animals, roads, fences, pumpkins and mountains.  The real fun began when I passed out pom pons clipped to a clothes pin.  These became our painting tools when dipped in muted tones of paint. The children enjoyed dabbing the leaves on the branches of the trees and then quickly folding and pressing the wet paint onto the bottom of their paper creating a reflection.
































































Monday, October 6, 2014

Miro Monsters - Grades 1, 2 and 3

It is close to Halloween and so I thought it would be fun to introduce my young artists to the Spanish abstract artist Joan Miro.  
We looked at several of his images and discussed the bright colors, bold black lines and shapes before we set off to work.
We began by cutting circle and oval stencil shapes from paper.  We used the negative shape and drew around the edge with colored chalk.  The stencil was placed on the white background paper and the chalk was rubbed in the negative space.  I love the soft look of the chalk on the paper.
Next black ink was passed out and the students were to pretend they were dancing across their paper to create rhythmic lines that swirled and moved across the picture plane. 
 Samples of Miro's lines were on display for the students to reference as well .  But mostly I wanted the students to feel the carefree motion of their paint brush in their hands.  I pointed out that it was a good idea to hold the end of their paint brush as they painted to achieve a carefree line.
The following week we again observed some of Miro's paintings and talked about abstract art.  The children commented on images they saw in his work.  The conversation became quite lively and engaging.
Scrap boxes, scissors and glue were set out and the students examined their work to see if they could find an image to build upon.  We discussed Halloween briefly and thought it would be fun to create our very own monsters from our work.  Colorful cut out shapes were added for bodies and black crayon was used to add any detail needed for facial features, hair, legs and the like.
The students felt happy and satisfied with their creations and I was also pleased with the many concepts and techniques they had learned in this art history lesson.





Monday, September 22, 2014

Van Gogh inspired Sunflowers

A colleague once told me "keep it simple stupid".  I jumped into the school year with a project far too complex for our first lesson.  I came back this week with a simpler approach that was quite refreshing for me and the students.
Each table had a still life set up for the students to observe and draw from.  Sharpies were used to outline the pencil drawing, lastly watercolor paint was applied to complete the project.
Here is lower elementary's interpretation of Van Gogh's Sunflower's.