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Welcome to Dream, Draw Create! This blog features art projects for children. These projects have been used in my classes. My lessons allow children to learn about all the elements and principles of art while striving to introduce them to many genres of art.

"It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge." - Albert Einstein

Friday, October 24, 2014

Reflecting on the Hudson River Painters - Grades 1, 2 & 3

Living in the region so closely associated with the Hudson River Painters is a real bonus at this time of the year.  The children are well aware of the beauty surrounding them and inspiration comes easily to them.
This lesson was a quick forty minute lesson which involved many different mediums such as crayon, regular and chunky, pastel, and paint.  Many concepts, and methods of application of the various mediums were introduced and reviewed.  For instance we discussed the smooth  texture we achieve when a crayon is rubbed on its side on paper.  We also spoke about value and how we could get a light or dark shade by the pressure that was applied on the crayon.
 Before the trees were drawn the paper was folded in half and then black pastel was used for drawing the trees on the folded line. The bold pastel lines, the use of thick and think lines for branches helped to create a nice focal point for these pieces. Movement was also discussed and how it would look like a windy day if the branches of the trees were bent or curved.
  Students could either portray the leaves reflecting in a body of water or simply have them appear to be falling on the ground.
Other elements were added with crayon such as animals, roads, fences, pumpkins and mountains.  The real fun began when I passed out pom pons clipped to a clothes pin.  These became our painting tools when dipped in muted tones of paint. The children enjoyed dabbing the leaves on the branches of the trees and then quickly folding and pressing the wet paint onto the bottom of their paper creating a reflection.
































































Monday, October 6, 2014

Miro Monsters - Grades 1, 2 and 3

It is close to Halloween and so I thought it would be fun to introduce my young artists to the Spanish abstract artist Joan Miro.  
We looked at several of his images and discussed the bright colors, bold black lines and shapes before we set off to work.
We began by cutting circle and oval stencil shapes from paper.  We used the negative shape and drew around the edge with colored chalk.  The stencil was placed on the white background paper and the chalk was rubbed in the negative space.  I love the soft look of the chalk on the paper.
Next black ink was passed out and the students were to pretend they were dancing across their paper to create rhythmic lines that swirled and moved across the picture plane. 
 Samples of Miro's lines were on display for the students to reference as well .  But mostly I wanted the students to feel the carefree motion of their paint brush in their hands.  I pointed out that it was a good idea to hold the end of their paint brush as they painted to achieve a carefree line.
The following week we again observed some of Miro's paintings and talked about abstract art.  The children commented on images they saw in his work.  The conversation became quite lively and engaging.
Scrap boxes, scissors and glue were set out and the students examined their work to see if they could find an image to build upon.  We discussed Halloween briefly and thought it would be fun to create our very own monsters from our work.  Colorful cut out shapes were added for bodies and black crayon was used to add any detail needed for facial features, hair, legs and the like.
The students felt happy and satisfied with their creations and I was also pleased with the many concepts and techniques they had learned in this art history lesson.





Monday, September 22, 2014

Van Gogh inspired Sunflowers

A colleague once told me "keep it simple stupid".  I jumped into the school year with a project far too complex for our first lesson.  I came back this week with a simpler approach that was quite refreshing for me and the students.
Each table had a still life set up for the students to observe and draw from.  Sharpies were used to outline the pencil drawing, lastly watercolor paint was applied to complete the project.
Here is lower elementary's interpretation of Van Gogh's Sunflower's.





Tuesday, September 2, 2014

On the move with Marcel DuChamp - Grades 7 & 8

This was an end of the year lesson which I did with my seventh and eighth grade middle school students last June.  We studied DuChamp's Painting Nude Descending A Staircase.  It helped the students understand the principle of movement in a piece of art work.
I began the lesson by showing the students images of DuChamp's painting and we looked closely to see how movement was achieved.  We noted the repetition of the figure in the painting.  The monochromatic color scheme helped the students see the progression of the descending figure.
I then photographed the students in a action pose.  The images were printed and the contour of the image was cut out.  A variety of paper was set out for the students to choose from. They traced their image on at least three or four sheets of colored paper, cut them out, then arranged them on background paper to create a composition demonstrating the principle of movement.  As you can see their work is very unique and if you knew them you would agree it reflects their personalities.








Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Clowning around in Pre K


It's summer time and thoughts of the classroom are not always on my mind. But I do love looking at these fun little clowns. Hope you're all having a fun summer.

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Rousseau inspired art

Using oil pastels and black watercolor wash my lower elementary students set out to imitate the beautiful work of Henri Rousseau.
Some of my students chose to add the black outline before the wash was added while others chose to use the black for definition afterwards.
Since the children in this group are first grade through third grade students, the results show a wide range of skill sets.

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Wire Hanger Sculptures - Grades 7 & 8

These sculpture pieces were created by my incredibly talented middle school students.
Each one is so unique and different.
Since this project has become such a main stay with so many art teachers including myself, all that was needed to motivate them was to show them samples by other students from various sites on the web.